Monday, August 11, 2008

The Supermarket

I went to one of the larger markets today to set up our pantry with all the basics. Although the selection would seem limited compared to the US, I found myself comparing it to the situation in Venezuela last summer.

The lacteos, dairy products, all are wonderful! Milk comes in a bag and oatmeal is in a cereal like box! The meat looked good but the names of all the cuts are different. My favorite beef in Venezuela was 'lomito' but here that is a sandwich. I ended up buying ground beef and chicken which was easily recognizable. :)

The bread is purchased at the market rather than the 'panaderias' which are on every corner of Venezuela. The bread all looked very different and they have a bun which they call a 'galleta', which is a cookie in Venezuela. I will have to try several things to figure out what is what. You have the bread weighed and that determines the price.

The vegetables all looked nice and I saw the largest sweet potato pf my life! It was the size of a small watermelon!

All in all, I found the supermarket to be quite nice and enjoyed the experience. It was clean and organized. I did realize that I will have to learn to read some Portuguese in order to read many of the labels of products imported from Brazil. Many of the better products seem to be Brazilian. I found myself staring and getting confused as I tried to read what should have been easily understandable Spanish only to remind myself it was Portuguese and that is why I was struggling so. Whew!

The one thing that left me scratching my head was the fact that they had young female workers zooming around the place on Rollerblades! They were in uniform and obviously worked there, but they could not answer any questions. Just eye candy, I suppose...

22 comments:

Abouna said...

I'm sure you will have it all sorted out in no time.

When I first went to Vietnam, I didn't know any Vietnamese, and what wasn't in Vietnamese was in French. Even though I knew some French at the time, I was far from proficient in it, but I managed to muddle through.

All in all, it was a great experience and a wonderful adventure.

Glenn Bartley said...

Sounds nice there.

Here is a link to news from Venezuela, about the Indians, some sad news at that: http://www.foxnews.com/story/0,2933,400901,00.html. Figured you would want to read about this.

Harry said...

Are you settled already? You certainly do work quickly.

Obob said...

once again, you show your courage. Not to sound like a brownnose, but the work of a missionary is one that deserves praise unending, yet it goes to people not seeking that praise. I wish more people understood your true sense of modesty
be good down there

Dawn said...

Sounds like a very adventuresome trip to the market! I"m glad they have a good variety.

gecko said...

I admire your courage and determination! I'm sure there will be some "disasters" early on, but it sure will make some interesting reading.......good luck.

CONNIE'S THOUGHTS FROM THE HEART said...

I can only imagine being in such a situation. You will learn and "knowing you", as I feel that I do, it want take you long.

When we visited a place in Mexico going to the Mission field. A group of us went for a walk. Somehow we got turned around and couldn't read the street signs or speak to anyone. It was very scary to say the least. I made up my mind that while I was there, I was leaning as much of the language that I could. I didn't learn the language but before that week was over, I could somehow understand what they were saying to me. I know if I lived in a country where I could not speak the language, I would learn and be quick about it. I feel so sorry, for those living in our country five years and much longer and still can't say two words in English. What doors would open to them if they could just speak.

Oh, well enough of that. I was so happy to have you visit me tonight. Hope you have a great day tomorrow. connie from Texas

Starla said...

OK, roller blades???? Well hopefully you won't get any strange food, lol.

Findalis said...

At least the shelves were stocked with food and the natives seem friendly.

When I first went to Israel I was in for a bit of a culture shock. The milk came in bags. And there was only 1% and 3% milk. Took me days to figure out that I needed a special "milk" pitcher for the bags. But they are easy to freeze in bags and a great way to stock up on supplies. Now only if we could get milk in bags here in the US.

MightyMom said...

Portuguese drives me crazy. Especially hearing is spoken. I THINK I ought to know this!! I understand every 5th word and think is my Spanish REALLY that bad??? Then I realize it's Portuguese. Seeing it written I grasp more as the words "look similar" I was wondering if the majority of folks in Paraguay spoke Portuguese too??

Thursday's Child said...

Sounds like my early trips to the grocery store here and in Kuwait. You'll get a hang of it soon. I sure wish I was there with you!

Anonymous said...

So... happy that you are there and have a home awaiting you. Have a wonderful time with those "most beautiful grandchldrenon earth"
guess who?

Jane said...

Well, as you said, life IS an adventure.
We have been shocked by the prices here. Inflation is over 40%. The only good thing is the very low gas prices so those that can shop around to get the best prices.

Pat said...

You have started the journey full speed ahead---you will learn the Portugese in no time, I am sure!!

We used to have workers at Pace (Sam's Club bougth them out 10 years ago or so!!) who skated around to actually HELP people....it sure nmade price checks quicker, too. Amazing how most worldview is for the eye candy in EVERY thing (American commercials prove that!!)....sex sells!! And, we have an indulging carnal world that proves it!!

Blessings....praying for you all!!

AI said...

I think I'd miss my usual Safeway like supermarkets but it sounds as if you're doing ok. Here in Aust' life is pretty much like the States, you know the drill...spoilt for choice and payment methods ...
Blessings
~Otto
American Interests

Webutante said...

Hey Rita, best wishes in your latest chapter and adventures!

Pam said...

The Walmart in Queretaro, Mexico has those rollerbladers all over the place and the store is spotless. Much prettier and neater than any I've ever been in in the states.

Remember the first trip to the grocery store when we moved to Mexico? You should post about that!

Pam said...

I just read the article which Glenn informed you about. So sad!

Nina in Portugal said...

Hey...helping you identify some of the Brazilian grocery store items in Portuguese might be the only thing I could help you with....But I would count it an honor!!

The Localmalcontent said...

Sounds very interesting, and adventurous!

Are there any roadside fruitstands, or farmers selling vegetables around?

Muddling Through said...

How funny! You know they used to have workers on roller blades in the Sam's Club warehouse stores here in the States years ago. They, too, went whizzing along. I mostly just tried to stay out of their way. :)

~Elaine~

Brenda said...

lol, the girls on rollerblades. . sometimes they actually CAN answer your questions. . . . sometimes. . . its the "fachada" that counts in Paraguay. if it looks like they have the answers then that is enough.

Try Hiperseis. Its the best in my opinion.

Sorry to hear you were sick :( not a good way to start out in a new country.